Food for Thought: The Most Invaluable Lesson I Learned from Growing My Own Food

Image result for gardening

From The Melanin Man:

Since I returned to corporate plantation six months (don’t judge me lol) I had to cease my gardening activities. Also due to the fact the seasons were changing and we’re planning to move from our current location in less than six months from now, it made sense to get ready to move on from gardening for the time being.

After going through the experience of growing my own food, besides realizing the obvious importance of sunlight in the growth and development of my crops, there was one other thing I learned that has become the most underappreciated fact in today’s society:

Growing your own food, especially in the organic manner, takes TIME!!

Big whoop de doo, right?!

Well, I thought about the time, not even a hundred years ago, before the modern-day refrigerator were introduced to the general public and grocery stores as we know them were non-existent. The probability of eating home-grown food or at the very least eating secondhand food that was fresh and organic was no less than 85%, I’m assuming. But I don’t think I’m that far off base.

But anyway, I know for the simplest and easiest crops it takes at least 55-60 days to have a fully-developed product, and that’s when conditions (climate and weather, soil, hungry wildlife etc.) are up to par. There was always the chance that your crops could get washed away by a destructive storm or you have visits from critters and creatures of all sizes who don’t know that the crops they’re eating is not theirs. What a deflating feeling to have your hard labor and meal ticket ( no pun intended) destroyed in one fell swoop. Keep in mind this is happening 80-100 years ago when today’s technology wasn’t yet in widespread use. And although there have methods of storing foods in those times prior to the modern era, it was no where today’s methods where you can freeze your food for a indefinite amount of time and have the ability to eat that same food year or two later.

Now let me ask you a question:

Do you ever hear of people starving in those times?

That’s what the-powers-that be claim! Or is there a hidden agenda in play? (Of course there is!)

I DO know there are millions of people starving today in, allegedly, the most advanced, technological period in human history. Even if you do have means to afford it or not. The malnourishment of food today, which is NOT a coincidence, is a very HUGE concern than in centuries past. I’m pretty confident that the food produced in the past held people over in far longer periods than the food today.

And if that’s the case, how often did people eat when the vegetables, fruits, and even the livestock (for you meat eaters lol) was not manipulated and stripped of its nutrients?

How long could we go without eating in that reality, considering that the air (the first thing we “eat”) and water was cleaner then than now and again the food production was NOT time friendly?

Are we even suppose to be eating everyday? Just something to think about, fam.

I know one thing…I have greater appreciation for the process of growing your own food. I can’t wait till we move so I can start my garden over again.

Hopefully I can learn some more life lessons. Enjoy the day, fam!

Peace and Love to my melanated family,

The Melanin Man

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5 thoughts on “Food for Thought: The Most Invaluable Lesson I Learned from Growing My Own Food

      • Everything except my succulents die, to be honest. And I can’t add those to my pasta sauce, so..
        I’ve tried basil several times in a planter on the windowsill. Death becomes it every time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sorry to hear that smh. Don’t give up on it. I know it’s hard to grow food, etc. when you’re not able to put it in some real dirt.. Hopefully one day you’ll have some yard, assuming you don’t have now, to do some damage. I can personally say it’s a rewarding experience.

        Like

      • I bet! In a rented townhouse now so we can only do so much. My sister graduated from a gardening program so she knows the basics of outdoor growing. We want a community garden eventually where people can learn and rent plots.

        Liked by 1 person

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