Did you know? “Chess” and “Checkers”

chess-and-checkers

 

 

 

From the Melanated Man:

Excerpt taken from African Holistic Health by Dr. Llaila Afrika

The games of “chess” and “checkers” are extracted from an African divination and healing device call Draughts. This device looks exactly like chess except the so-called board has 27 squares, which are laid out in 3 rows of squares with 9 columns. Each column of nine squares represents the nine energy forces (Chakras) of the individual respectively; nine columns for the body, nine for the mind, and nine for the spirit. The so-called playing pieces were placed in a Terra Cotta Bowl or cloth bag and mixed by shaking. Next, the pieces were removed (without looking) and placed on the board from right to left. The pieces have meanings similarly to “tarot cards.” These diving statues (pieces) once placed on the board were read to diagnose the illness, social problem, emotional issues and prescribe treatment.

 

Seek to learn something new each day you have on this earth.

 

Peace and love to my melanated family,

The Melanated Man

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5 thoughts on “Did you know? “Chess” and “Checkers”

  1. Yes I remember reading that in his book. Not many people know this. I also remember reading this years ago on a website:

    “In Ancient Egypt(Kemet), games were part of religious life. Their most popular game was Senat in which counters, or markers, were moved around a game board. Winning the game came by one player removing all of his/her pieces before the opponent did (Hawass,Tutankhamun, p235). A wall painting on the tomb of the Egyptian queen Nefretari, wife of Ramses II (1304-1237 BC), shows her playing Senat. It symbolizes the struggle between good and evil as well as stands magically for rebirth and resurrection. The African games known as Mancala or Wari are among the oldest games, dating back at least to 5000 BC. In these games, beans, seeds, and other small objects were moved around a playing board with hollowed out cups. A player tried to capture as many objects as possible. Both Senat and Mancala games and four other types were discovered when the tomb of Tutankhamen — an Egyptian king who reigned from 1348-1339 BC — was discovered. An Egyptian board game of primitive “checkers” from 1000 BC is in the British Museum. Another type — called Nine Men’s Morris, Mill, Morelles, or Morels — has been found carved in the roofing slabs of an Egyptian temple and dating between 1400 and 1300 BC. The object of the game, of which there are many versions, is for each player to try to capture an opponent’s piece and to prevent the opponent from moving any pieces. Note how closely this resembles Chess as we know it today.”

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